The Stars Died So That You Could Be Here Today

This is my favorite quote for this dark, rainy time of year…

The amazing thing is that every atom in your body came from a star that exploded. And, the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics: You are all stardust. You couldn’t be here if stars hadn’t exploded, because the elements – the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution – weren’t created at the beginning of time. They were created in the nuclear furnaces of stars, and the only way they could get into your body is if those stars were kind enough to explode. So, forget Jesus. The stars died so that you could be here today.

Quote by Lawrence M. Krauss sourced from Wikiquote.

Tips for installing VMware Single Sign-on in vSphere 5.1.0a

I’ve lost many hours of my life trying to get VMware Single Sign-on(SSO) installed for an installation of vSphere 5.1.  Here are some of the tips that I used to finally get it installed.

First a few details.  The vSphere install was on a Windows 2008 server, and the database backend was Oracle 11g.

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Why my iPad 3 has Verizon LTE

I was thinking back to an earlier post, about AT&T’s 3G coverage. This time around, I finally had a choice to go with Verizon. It’s LTE, which is a better technology (and AT&T’s LTE is probably similar, but there isn’t LTE in Seattle for AT&T.)  Here’s the results for my new Verizon LTE iPad (ignore where it says iPhone. I’m using the same app on both the iPhone and iPad, but it’s not a universal app.)

Verizon LTE

For comparison, I went back and tested my iPhone again, now with a new 4G icon. The last time I did this, just about two years ago, I was about half a mile away from where I’m at now. Two years, and half a mile closer to Seattle, and I get this.

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Push SSH public keys to multiple host

I’m starting a new job where I need to have my SSH keys pushed to hundreds of Red Hat servers. The special sauce is a command called ssh-copy-id. However, using this command requires you answering a (yes/no) question, then shortly thereafter enter your password. Painful. Here’s how push your keys without the pain.
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